My new AIP AI270-spo





is it rare?

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Somewhat I’d say: it’s a generic/non-branded version of the standard 270-SPO that Edwards supposdly made for OEM purposes (i.e. companies that don’t make every component of a fire alarm system: with brands like AIP though they could get what they needed for their systems to be complete without using a big brand name like Edwards).

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Neat! I’ve seen these on ESL systems in the past

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Thank you man. Fun fact this is actually my first pull station. I have plenty of notification devices, (but no pull stations for some reason)

These were commonly used on older edwards systems like the Irc3, 6500/6700 custom, 8500/5800, or just simply the 270a spo (aka Hollywood’s chosen one), or 275/274s.

The standard Edwards version was at least: as I said the AIP version was supposedly meant for non-Edwards systems that needed pull stations. I’ve seen very few systems with AIP devices in general (heck the only one I know of is the Davis K-8 school that Zak Wolf went to: a few of the original Simplex 4251-30s were replaced with AIP AI270-SPOs at one time likely due to a few of the former failing, though both have likely since been replaced with BG-12s due to the whole system getting an upgrade some years back).

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Thats cool. I guess aip ai120spos are getting rarer and rarer

By the way. What does eol mean?

@Gary_Scott End-of-life I believe

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Means that the device is due to be replaced either because of a recall or past the operation limit

“EOL” can mean “end of life”, but in the life safety industry it more commonly refers to “end of line resistors”, used at the end of a conventional system’s zone circuits to allow the panel to supervise them (since obviously a problem with any of the zones may render them nonfunctional, which would of course be bad).

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eol means end of line. That means the pull station had a resistor which shows the conventional panel the zone is still working. if a device on the zone is missing, the resistor wont show the panel its there and the panel will go into fault to show the system isnt fully functional

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That’s literally what I already said.

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Oh ok thats cool i was wondering what eol ment

Nice! I have the wire lead version (AI270A-SPO)

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That’s awesome, I guess we’re twins. We have the same type of pull stations. The only difference is one being conventional and one being addressable.

No: “wire leads” means it has wires instead of a terminal strip on the back. The AIP variants of the 270-series were never made in addressable versions as far as anyone knows.

Oh ok. I always thought ai270a spo means addressable

No: the “AI” part denotes it as the AIP variant, “270” is the series it belongs to, “A” indicates that it has wire leads, & “SPO” means “single-pole, open circuit”, referring to the switch, since the 270-DPO is double-pole.