Very old panel acquired

My uncle gave me this old panel from one of the schools he works at, it was taken out of service 7 years ago. VERY RARE. Edwards NO. 1221













That is a very nice vintage panel that you managed to get! Looks really cool! Glad you were able to acquire it!

Definitely an AC system. Do you know what devices ran on the system? Or what caused the blackening effect? It looks like some kind of chemical reaction. Anyways, really neat panel!

that is a scorch mark from a resistor getting really hot. You can see the resistor got hot and turned dark on the top left of the panel. the pull stations were Edwards break glass pull stations (NO. 227) and AC horns.

Here are the devices that ran on the system

The pull station

















And the horn













I don’t know the model number, nor the voltage of this horn. If anybody knows, please let me know!

Typical coil-wound resistors, these can get scorching hot, and I really mean hot.



Careful if you break one of these by accident, I think the “core” that the resistive wire is wound on is asbestos, unless it’s bog standard ceramic. By the way it kinda sucks that the panels’ schematic got burned off, and even that I wonder how hot it got for the panel’s exterior to even start having burn marks…



As for the horn, these must be early Adaptahorns (I don’t remember the model no# but they definitely ran on AC)

it got hot enough to where it caught fire, judging by the scorch marks. I also forgot to point out that the panel’s paint is also chipping at the bottom of the can. I really hope it’s not lead based paint. I do plan on restoring this panel at some point in the future, but I need to get supplies in order to do (I have most of it already).

If it can actually heat up enough to catch FIRE then I would be incredibly careful with it. :shock:

Cool! So you were able to get other devices out of the system. Too bad you don’t know the voltage on that horn. I’d love to see it in action.

Wow, that is very neat indeed! Never seen anything like that before, very nice!

Here’s the patent for the pull station, it dates back all the way to 1935!



<LINK_TEXT text=“US208A - Improvement in the art of manufacturing cast-iron cannon - Google Patents … =Us2083324”>US2083324A - Alarm signal station - Google Patents</LINK_TEXT>

I honestly didn’t think that it would actually be that old! Great find!

Just so you know, the resistors are wire-wound, ceramic resistors. Please take note that behind the resistor where the burns started, you’ve probably noticed a white spot. Fire alarm panels that are at least as old as yours used “ebony-asbestos” boards. That white spot you see behind the resistor is exposed asbestos. Where the resistor at some point melted off that black stuff, which is bakelite plastic. As long as the exposed asbestos is moistened, or sealed off, you’ll be fine.

I did clean the panel at some point, I haven’t noticed anything wrong with my health since I got the panel so I’m probably not gonna die from exposure. I might paint over it at some point, but for now, the panel lies in a closet with a towel under it.

Asbestos symptoms may not manifest for years or even decades after exposure.



(Not trying to scare, just mentioning.)

Is that the only thing that could contain asbestos in the panel? I’m starting to worry about when I cleaned the panel, i probably got exposure.

The board the components are mounted on, is the only part that contains asbestos. If you seal that spot up, there will be no further possibility of exposure.

I have some Rustoleum clear coat that I can spray over it.

Is that gonna be enough to seal it up?

If a generous layer is applied, yes.