Whatever happened to "twoplyboy" on YouTube?

I was going to watch one of his older bell test videos, but when I looked at his channel, all of his videos were apparently gone. The worst part about this is that I haven’t seen his bell test video from March 2015 (because at around that time, college had a higher priority to me than watching videos). I am disheartened by this.



Any idea why he deleted* all his videos? I’m sure there’s a good reason, but I personally don’t like it when something like this happens without warning.



*Sidenote: I am almost certain that all the videos posted to his channel because I had email notifications enabled at the time when the March 2015 test video was posted. I clicked on the “View video” button (since I use Gmail) and it said that the video is unavailable.

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I was wondering the same thing. I went on his channel today and his videos are gone…It really bothers me because I enjoyed watching his videos, because he made long and interesting test videos. Let me know if you guys find anything about about him! :slight_smile:

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Sorry for major bump, I just wanted to give some closure if anyone was still wondering. Twoplyboy has one video up as of about a month ago, and someone asked him in the comments why he deleted all the videos. He basically said that some of the building owners didn’t like that their buildings were on YouTube, and he decided to delete all of his test videos to avoid any legal issues with building owners. It’s unfortunate that this happened, but it’s for the best I guess.

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Actually, I’ve heard some people claim that some, if not all of his videos were set to private rather than deleting them.

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That could be possible. All he stated in the comment was that he “had to pull them down.” I guess it’s open to interpretation.

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I’m pretty sure they’re gone. Take a look at his view count, only 872 views. That covers the one video he still has posted. Even if private or unlisted, the views from the rest of the videos would still show up in the total view count.



It’s a shame, I always enjoyed his videos.

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I apologize for the MAJOR bump, but as of 2018, twoplyboy made about 1/4 of his videos viewable again, and it turns out that he did private them, because privating your videos will still take views off of your channel, and there’s a playlist with all the tests, and it shows one’s that are non-viewable as private. The videos are ones that do not show the entire building or are legal to video in.

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So the videos that are private you can only view if you are friends with him or something like that?

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Nope. When a video is set to private no one except the owner of said video can see it.

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Damn it. I was really hoping to see the video of the 4051s again.

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I think many, if not most of the twoplyboy videos, are back!

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Yeah they are but some which I really like including the elementary school with the flush-mount 4051s aren’t up and most likely will never be put back up.

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As of 2021, Twoplyboy still has a lot of his bell test videos private, which is unfortunate because I was really interested in seeing the ones I have watched and the ones I haven’t watched. At least a handful of his old videos were put back up again. The only annoying part of YouTube I despise is that you can’t add them to playlists because of YouTube Kids. Thinking about the privacy issues where building owners don’t want to see their video on YouTube, it may affect those who post bell/field test videos (not saying it definitely will, chances are significantly low from what I see), where the owners demand those like twoplyboy who tested their fire alarm system and uploaded it to YouTube to take the video down because of privacy reasons.

I looked at Safetech’s Fire Alarm Test playlist, and tests 33, 35, 51, 67 were privated. I’m guessing it’s for the same reason (except for 33 that got copyrighted by WMG and it’s blocked for the United States)

I’m hoping one day, Twoplyboy will make ALL of the bell tests viewable again or uploads them in some other browser at one point, and I could probably download them all in case he changes his mind again and privates them all (or deletes them), that way, we’re able to watch them again. The plan I have in mind is to make a public playlist, upload all of Twoplyboy’s bell tests to YouTube, set them all as unlisted, then add all of the bell tests to the playlist. I’m not sure if it’s a good idea, but the playlist will ONLY become viewable to the public if twoplyboy privates the videos again or deletes his channel. I wish I could ask twoplyboy if he’s able to make all of his bell test videos unlisted and send me the links of the bell tests so I can do this “project”. However, the answer will likely be no, but who knows. I miss watching the rest of the bell tests.

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Yeah to most of this, had no idea one of SAFETECH’s videos got copyright-claimed though (how I can’t even imagine, unless for whatever reason he used copyrighted music in it, don’t know why he would though as he’s not known for having music in his videos, except the intro theme).

Maybe there was background music playing?
Or maybe the claims are wrong. The Content ID system is more sensitive than a TrueAlarm - it put no fewer than 5 (!) claims on white noise.

@SAFETECH, if there wasn’t actually any music, you can file a dispute. Here’s how:
https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/2797454

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“The only annoying part of YouTube I despise is that you can’t add them to playlists because of YouTube Kids”

That’s because @SAFETECH has incorrectly marked the videos as “made for kids”.
“Made for kids” means targeted at children under 13.
These are some of YouTube’s official considerations for whether something’s made for kids or not.

  • Subject matter of the video (e.g. educational content for preschoolers).
  • Whether the video includes child actors or models.
  • Whether the video includes characters, celebrities, or toys that appeal to children, including animated characters or cartoon figures.
  • Whether the video includes activities that appeal to children, such as play-acting, simple songs or games, or early education.
  • Whether the video includes songs, stories, or poems for children.

Even if the following apply, a video is not automatically considered “made for kids”:

  • It’s safe or appropriate for everyone to watch (aka it’s “family friendly”).
  • It covers an activity that’s traditionally associated with children.
  • Children may incidentally see it.

Here are some examples of the types of videos that could be considered general audience.
General audience content is NOT considered to be “made for kids”.

  • A DIY video teaching hobbyists how to remake dolls or to make clay figurines (I’m sure that a video teaching hobbyists how to set up a fire alarm system would be covered by this provision)
  • A family vlog telling other parents about an amusement park visit
  • A video featuring detailed instructions around creating mods or avatars
  • Animated content that appeals to everyone
  • A gaming video that features adult humor
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Technically speaking, don’t you mean twoplyboy? Last I checked SAFETECH does not have any of his videos marked as “made for kids”. I agree though, Youtube’s bots/automated systems are over-sensitive. They really need to have human employees take a look at whatever the system flags & then decide the best course of action instead of letting the system itself make the decision.

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